Trakai Castle, Lithuania
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Trakai Castle, Lithuania

© 123rf.com / Vaida Petreikiene

Lithuania Travel Guide

Key Facts
Area

65,300 sq km (25,212 sq miles).

Population

2,850,030 (UN estimate 2016).

Population density

44.2 per sq km.

Capital

Vilnius.

Government

Republic.

Head of state

President Gitanas Nauseda since 2019.

Head of government

Prime Minister Ingrida Šimonytė since 2020.

Electricity

220 volts AC, 50Hz. European-style plugs with two round pins are standard.

Lithuania is a spellbinding land of castles, lakes and forests. Though relatively few knew of its charms until recently, Lithuania's capital, Vilnius, is one of Europe's most enchanting cities, owing especially to its Baroque old town. Then there is the Baltic shore, which may not have the sun-soaked appeal of other coasts, but is idyllic and largely unspoilt. The southernmost country in the Baltics, Lithuania is also home to vast plains parted by hills and sand dunes.

Lithuanian independence came soon after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. By 1995, the transition to a full market economy had been completed. The long-running border dispute with Poland was settled with the signing of a friendship and co-operation treaty in January 1992 and negotiations with Russia led to the withdrawal of the remaining Russian troops in Lithuania in August 1993. The Russian connection remains, however, with Russians being the second largest ethnic minority in the country. The largest of the three Baltic states, Lithuania gaining EU membership in 2004, since which time the country has been thrust on to the global stage, encouraging more visitors than ever.

Most of the attraction for Lithuania lies with its natural treasures. Much of the country is verdant, with several national parks that are perfect for hikers and explorers. All around the country there are countless sprawling forests ripe for wandering, as well as numerous lakes sprinkled across the landscape.

Perhaps the country's trump card is the Baltic coastline, where beguiling wetlands brim with wildlife, most notably the thousands of bird species. There's also the Curonian Spit, a stunning 100km strip of land that separates the Curonian Lagoon from the Baltic Sea, which is covered in white sands.

Travel Advice

Coronavirus travel health

Check the latest information on risk from COVID-19 for Lithuania on the TravelHealthPro website

See the TravelHealthPro website for further advice on travel abroad and reducing spread of respiratory viruses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

International travel

Commercial flights are operating to and from Lithuania. You should check with your travel company for the latest information on their services.

Entry and borders

See Entry requirements to find out what you will need to do when you arrive in Lithuania.

Returning to the UK

Travelling from and returning to the UK

Check what you must do to travel abroad and return to England, Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland.

If you plan to pass through another country to return to the UK, check the travel advice for the country you’re transiting.

Be prepared for your plans to change

No travel is risk-free during COVID. Countries may further restrict travel or bring in new rules at short notice, for example due to a new COVID-19 variant. Check with your travel company or airline for any transport changes which may delay your journey home.

If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

Plan ahead and make sure you:

  • can access money
  • understand what your insurance will cover
  • can make arrangements to extend your stay and be away for longer than planned

Facemasks

The Lithuanian Government lifted the majority of COVID-19 related restrictions on 1 May.

Medical facemasks remain mandatory to visit patients in medical facilities. These rules do not apply to children under the age of six, or people with a medical exemption. If you cannot wear facemasks on medical grounds, you are advised to wear face shields if possible. Individual medical facilities have the right to apply requirements for other patients, staff, and visitors.

The Lithuanian Government recommends that people should continue to wear facemasks in other indoor public places and on public transport, although it is no longer mandatory.

Public places and services

The Lithuanian Government no longer requires individuals to prove their vaccination status in order to access non-essential services.

Healthcare in Lithuania

Healthcare services are operating as normal, but there may be occasional delays to appointments. Facemasks remain compulsory to visit patients in medical facilities. Individual medical facilities have the right to apply requirements for other patients, staff and visitors.

COVID-19 tests in Lithuania

As a result of the end of COVID-19-related restrictions on 1 May, Lithuania is changing its COVID-19 management strategy. COVID-19 testing and vaccinations will be carried out in ordinary medical facilities; mobile points will be removed; testing will be limited to people with symptoms at the discretion of the GP; and the need for testing before hospitalisation will be decided by individual medical facilities.

Individuals are no longer able to book COVID-19 tests directly themselves. This will be done by health providers at their discretion.

If you are required to have a test for the purposes of travel, you will need to book your test through a private clinic. A list of private clinics offering PCR and antigen tests is available on the Lithuanian Ministry of Health website. The tests booked through these clinics will be charged.

Not all testing centres in Lithuania offer results in English. If you require your results in English, you should request at the point of booking. English language result certificates are likely to incur additional charges.

Testing positive for COVID-19 in Lithuania

Self-isolation is no longer mandatory for individuals who test positive for COVID-19. If you have symptoms you are advised not to go to work, school or public places.

COVID-19 vaccines if you live in Lithuania

Wherever possible British nationals should aim to be vaccinated in the country where they live.

The Lithuanian national vaccination uses Pfizer-BioNTech, AstraZeneca, Moderna and Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccines. British nationals resident in Lithuania are eligible for vaccination. You can book vaccination online or with a GP in Lithuania. Vaccination is recommended in Lithuania for children over 5 years of age, and a booster dose from 12 years of age.

Children aged five years and older are eligible for vaccination in Lithuania. Children aged five to 11 years (inclusive) will be offered a reduced volume dose of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. Children aged 12 to 16 years will be offered either standard Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccines.

Find out more, including about vaccines that are authorised in the UK or approved by the World Health Organisation, on the COVID-19 vaccines if you live abroad page.

Lithuania offers COVID-19 boosters to all residents aged 18 and over, from four months after they completed their first course of COVID-19 vaccine. British nationals resident in Lithuania who wish to register for a booster can book online.

If you receive your COVID-19 vaccination in Lithuania, you can get an EU Digital COVID Certificate from the national authorities. The Certificate proves that you have been vaccinated against COVID-19, received a negative test result, or recovered from COVID-19. It will help facilitate your travel within the EU and, in some countries, you can use it to demonstrate your COVID-19 status to businesses and other organisations. For further information visit the European Commission’s EU Digital COVID Certificate page.

Finance

For information on financial support you can access whilst abroad, visit our financial assistance guidance.

Further information

Further details on Lithuania’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic are available in English on the Lithuanian Government Korona Stop website.

On 24 February 2022, Lithuania entered into a state of announced a State of Emergency, in response to Russian military action in Ukraine. Rules relating to the State of Emergency may change at short notice. During the State of Emergency, British nationals in Lithuania must abide by the following restrictions:

  • You are required to carry photo identification at all times when traveling in Lithuania and must present your ID to law enforcement officers when requested.
  • You must not share social media content, articles, TV or radio programmes originating from entities directly or indirectly controlled by the governments of Russia or Belarus, within the territory of Lithuania. Journalists and media organisation seeking an exemption should contact the Lithuanian Radio and Television Commission.
  • You must not organise meetings or events for the purpose of supporting the actions of the governments of Russia and Belarus.
  • Additional spot checks may be in operation in at border crossings, which may lead to some delays if you are travelling by road. You must following the instructions of Lithuanian State Border Guard officials.

Crime

There have been reports of petty theft and robbery. Beware of pickpockets, avoid unlit streets and parks at night, and be extra vigilant if you’re walking alone. Take extra care of your belongings in busy locations and on public transport. Don’t leave coats and handbags unattended in bars, pubs and clubs.

A small number of tourists have reported incidents on public transport and around the train station area of Vilnius where they have been approached by small groups of people asking for money or help. Be vigilant in these areas.

Don’t leave drinks unattended and be wary of accepting food and drink from strangers in bars, nightclubs and restaurants.

Car theft is a problem in certain areas. Lock unattended vehicles and hide contents. Use guarded car parks in cities, especially overnight.

 

There have been a number of thefts of bicycles in Vilnius.

In an emergency or if you wish to report a crime, call the police on 112.

Local travel

Public transport

It is not always possible to buy tickets on local buses and or trolley-buses so it is advisable to purchase tickets in advance. More information on e-tickets and pre-charged travel cards is available at Getting around Vilnius.

Taxis are reasonably priced. Make sure the meter is used. It is cheaper and safer to phone for a taxi from a recognised company than to hail one in the street. Ask your hotel reception to call one. Do not use unregistered taxis.

Klaipeda, Nida and Palanga

If you intend to walk along the Curonian Spit be aware that after a short distance the Spit forms part of Kaliningrad, which is a territory of the Russian Federation.

Arriving from Belarus, Ukraine or Russia (including the Kaliningrad Oblast)

For more information on traveling to Lithuania from Belarus, Ukraine or Russia (including from the Kaliningrad Oblast), please see the Entry requirements page.

Road travel

In 2019 there were 184 road deaths in the Lithuania (source: Department for Transport). This equates to 6.6 road deaths per 100,000 of population and compares to the UK average of 2.6 road deaths per 100,000 of population in 2019.

If you are planning to drive in Lithuania, see information on Driving Abroad.

Licences and documentation

You can drive using a UK photo card driving licence. You must have suitable insurance and carry the original vehicle registration documents (copies are not acceptable).

If you’re living in Lithuania, check the Living in Guide for information on requirements for residents.

Driving a British car abroad

You may need a UK sticker to drive your car outside the UK. From 28 September 2021 UK stickers have replaced GB stickers. Check the GOV.UK Displaying number plates website for more information on what to do if you are driving outside the UK.

Road safety

Driving regulations

Winter tyres are a legal requirement in Lithuania between 10 November and 10 April.

Dipped headlights are compulsory all year round.

Speed limits, unless otherwise indicated, are 50km/h in towns, 90km/h on country roads and 110km/h on highways.

Don’t drink and drive. The legal blood-alcohol limit is 0.04%. Those found over the limit face a fine and possible imprisonment.

See the European Commission, AA and RAC guides for advice on driving in Lithuania.

Bringing a vehicle into Lithuania

When arriving in Lithuania with a car, border officials will ask for a passport which is valid for the duration of your stay, the original vehicle registration documents (copies are not acceptable) and evidence of international vehicle insurance (Green Card).

Winter travel

Be prepared for extremely cold and possibly hazardous weather if you intend to travel to Lithuania in the winter (October to March). There’s likely to be snow or ice on the ground and temperatures may drop to -25°C or below.

Attacks in Lithuania can’t be ruled out.

UK Counter Terrorism Policing has information and advice on staying safe abroad and what to do in the event of a terrorist attack. Find out more about the global threat from terrorism.

You should be aware of the global risk of indiscriminate terrorist attacks which could be in public areas, including those frequented by expatriates and foreign travellers.

There is a heightened threat of terrorist attack globally against UK interests and British nationals, from groups or individuals motivated by the conflict in Iraq and Syria. You should be vigilant at this time.

This page has information on travelling to Lithuania. Check what you must do to return to the UK.

This page reflects the UK government’s understanding of current rules for people travelling on a full ‘British Citizen’ passport from the UK, for the most common types of travel.

The authorities in Lithuania set and enforce entry rules.

State of Emergency

On 24 February 2022, Lithuania entered into a state of announced a State of Emergency, in response to Russian military action in Ukraine. Rules relating to the State of Emergency may change at short notice.

Check the ‘Safety and security’ section for more information.

All travellers

Lithuania ended all COVID-19 related entry restrictions on 1 May 2022. Travellers to Lithuania are no longer required to prove their vaccination status, recovery from COVID-19, have a negative COVID-19 test result on arrival or complete a passenger questionnaire. Self-isolation is no longer required.

Arrivals from Belarus, Ukraine or Russia (including the Kaliningrad Oblast)

If you have arrived in Lithuania from Belarus, Ukraine or Russia (including the Kaliningrad Oblast) and are in need of assistance, you should call +370 5246 2900 and select the option for “calling about an emergency involving a British national.” You can also send an enquiry via the web contact form.

All flights between Lithuanian and Belarus, Russia or Ukraine are suspended. British Nationals may travel to Lithuania from Belarus, Russia or Ukraine by car or bus. Trains between Kaliningrad and Moscow continue to transit through Lithuania. British Nationals may disembark these trains in Lithuania.

Check your passport and travel documents before you travel

Passport validity

If you are planning to travel to an EU country (except Ireland), or Switzerland, Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Andorra, Monaco, San Marino or Vatican City, you must follow the Schengen area passport requirements.

Your passport must be:

  • Issued less than 10 years before the date you enter the country (check the ‘date of issue’)
  • valid for at least 3 months after the day you plan to leave (check the ‘expiry date’)

You must check your passport meets these requirements before you travel. If your passport was issued before 1 October 2018, extra months may have been added to its expiry date.

Contact the embassy of the country you are visiting if you think that your passport does not meet both these requirements. Renew your passport if you need to.

Visas

You can travel to countries in the Schengen area for up to 90 days in any 180-day period without a visa. This applies if you travel as a tourist, to visit family or friends, to attend business meetings, cultural or sports events, or for short-term studies or training.

If you are travelling to Lithuania and other Schengen countries without a visa, make sure your whole visit is within the 90-day limit. Visits to Schengen countries within the previous 180 days before you travel count towards your 90 days.

To stay longer, to work or study, for business travel or for other reasons, you will need to meet the Lithuanian government’s entry requirements. Check with the Lithuanian Embassy what type of visa and/or work permit you may need.

If you are travelling to Lithuania for work, read the guidance on visas and permits.

If you stay in Lithuania with a residence permit or long-stay visa, this does not count towards your 90-day visa-free limit.

Passport stamping

Check your passport is stamped if you enter or exit the Schengen area through Lithuania as a visitor. Border guards will use passport stamps to check you’re complying with the 90-day visa-free limit for short stays in the Schengen area. If relevant entry or exit stamps are not in your passport, border guards will presume that you have overstayed your visa-free limit.

You can show evidence of when and where you entered or exited the Schengen area, and ask the border guards to add this date and location in your passport. Examples of acceptable evidence include boarding passes and tickets.

You may also need to:

  • show a return or onward ticket
  • show you have enough money for your stay

If you are resident in Lithuania, read our Living in Lithuania guide for passport stamping information.

UK Emergency Travel Documents

UK Emergency Travel Documents (ETDs) are accepted for entry, airside transit and exit from Lithuania.

Returning to the UK

Check what you must do to return to the UK..

State of Emergency

On 24 February 2022, Lithuania entered into a state of announced a State of Emergency, in response to Russian military action in Ukraine. Rules relating to the State of Emergency may change at short notice.

Check the ‘Safety and security’ section for more information.

Drugs

Don’t become involved with drugs. Possession of even very small quantities can lead to imprisonment or heavy fines.

Taking food and drink into the EU

You cannot take meat, milk or products containing them into EU countries. There are some exceptions for medical reasons, for example certain amounts of powdered infant milk, infant food, or pet food required for medical reasons. Check the rules about taking food and drink into the EU on the European Commission website.

Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Check the latest information on risk from COVID-19 for Lithuania on the TravelHealthPro website

See the healthcare information in the Coronavirus section for information on what to do if you think you have coronavirus while in Lithuania.

At least 8 weeks before your trip, check the latest country-specific health advice from the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC) on the TravelHealthPro website. Each country-specific page has information on vaccine recommendations, any current health risks or outbreaks, and factsheets with information on staying healthy abroad. Guidance is also available from NHS (Scotland) on the FitForTravel website.

General information on travel vaccinations and a travel health checklist is available on the NHS website. You may then wish to contact your health adviser or pharmacy for advice on other preventive measures and managing any pre-existing medical conditions while you’re abroad.

The legal status and regulation of some medicines prescribed or purchased in the UK can be different in other countries. If you’re travelling with prescription or over-the-counter medicine, read this guidance from NaTHNaC on best practice when travelling with medicines. For further information on the legal status of a specific medicine, you’ll need to contact the embassy, high commission or consulate of the country or territory you’re travelling to.

While travel can be enjoyable, it can sometimes be challenging. There are clear links between mental and physical health, so looking after yourself during travel and when abroad is important. Information on travelling with mental health conditions is available in our guidance page. Further information is also available from the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC).

Healthcare

You should get a free UK Global Health Insurance Card (GHIC) or European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) before leaving the UK. If you already have an EHIC it will still be valid as long as it remains in date.

The GHIC or EHIC entitles you to state provided medical treatment that may become necessary during your trip. Any treatment provided is on the same terms as Lithuanian nationals. If you don’t have your EHIC with you or you’ve lost it, you can call the NHS Overseas Healthcare Team on +44 191 218 1999 to get a Provisional Replacement Certificate.

It’s important to take out appropriate travel insurance for your needs. A GHIC or EHIC is not an alternative to travel insurance and you should have both before you travel. It does not cover all health-related costs, for example, medical repatriation, ongoing medical treatment and non-urgent treatment. Read more about what your travel insurance should cover.

If you’re living in Lithuania, you can also find more information on healthcare for residents in our Living In Lithuania guide.

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, dial 112 and ask for an ambulance. If you are referred to a medical facility for treatment you should contact your insurance/medical assistance company immediately.

The currency of Lithuania is the euro.

All major credit cards are accepted and there are plenty of ATMs for withdrawing local currency.

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission. If you need urgent help because something has happened to a friend or relative abroad, contact the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO) in London on 020 7008 5000 (24 hours).

Foreign travel checklist

Read our foreign travel checklist to help you plan for your trip abroad and stay safe while you’re there.

Travel safety

The FCDO travel advice helps you make your own decisions about foreign travel. Your safety is our main concern, but we can’t provide tailored advice for individual trips. If you’re concerned about whether or not it’s safe for you to travel, you should read the travel advice for the country or territory you’re travelling to, together with information from other sources you’ve identified, before making your own decision on whether to travel. Only you can decide whether it’s safe for you to travel.

When we judge the level of risk to British nationals in a particular place has become unacceptably high, we’ll state on the travel advice page for that country or territory that we advise against all or all but essential travel. Read more about how the FCDO assesses and categorises risk in foreign travel advice.

Our crisis overseas page suggests additional things you can do before and during foreign travel to help you stay safe.

Refunds and cancellations

If you wish to cancel or change a holiday that you’ve booked, you should contact your travel company. The question of refunds and cancellations is a matter for you and your travel company. Travel companies make their own decisions about whether or not to offer customers a refund. Many of them use our travel advice to help them reach these decisions, but we do not instruct travel companies on when they can or can’t offer a refund to their customers.

For more information about your rights if you wish to cancel a holiday, visit the Citizen’s Advice Bureau website. For help resolving problems with a flight booking, visit the website of the Civil Aviation Authority. For questions about travel insurance, contact your insurance provider and if you’re not happy with their response, you can complain to the Financial Ombudsman Service.

Registering your travel details with us

We’re no longer asking people to register with us before travel. Our foreign travel checklist and crisis overseas page suggest things you can do before and during foreign travel to plan your trip and stay safe.

Previous versions of FCDO travel advice

If you’re looking for a previous version of the FCDO travel advice, visit the National Archives website. Versions prior to 2 September 2020 will be archived as FCO travel advice. If you can’t find the page you’re looking for there, send the Travel Advice Team a request.

Further help

If you’re a British national and you have a question about travelling abroad that isn’t covered in our foreign travel advice or elsewhere on GOV.UK, you can submit an enquiry. We’re not able to provide tailored advice for specific trips.

Visa and passport information is updated regularly and is correct at the time of publishing. You should verify critical travel information independently with the relevant embassy before you travel.