Malta Travel Advice, Embassies & Tourist Offices

Travel Advice

Coronavirus travel health

Check the latest information on risk from COVID-19 for Malta on the TravelHealthPro website.

See the TravelHealthPro website for further advice on travel abroad and reducing spread of respiratory viruses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

You can schedule a test at any private testing clinic in Malta. The Malta Tourism Authority has collated a list of some of the possible providers.

Entry and borders

See Entry requirements to find out what you will need to do when you arrive in Malta.

Returning to the UK

Travelling from and returning to the UK

Check what you must do to travel abroad and return to England, Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland.

If you plan to pass through another country to return to the UK, check the travel advice for the country you’re transiting.

Be prepared for your plans to change

No travel is risk-free during COVID. Countries may further restrict travel or bring in new rules at short notice, for example due to a new COVID-19 variant. Check with your travel company or airline for any transport changes which may delay your journey home.

If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

Plan ahead and make sure you:

  • can access money
  • understand what your insurance will cover
  • can make arrangements to extend your stay and be away for longer than planned

Travel in Malta

It is not mandatory to wear a face mask inside, outside or on public transportation.

Public spaces and services

It is not mandatory to wear a face mask outside or inside, although it is at the discretion of individual establishments to ask customers to present a valid vaccination certificate or to wear a face mask.

If you live in England, Scotland, Northern Ireland or Wales, Malta will accept the UK’s COVID vaccine certification (both the digital and letter versions) as proof of your vaccination status. Digital certificates must include a verifiable 2D barcode (QR code). If you are travelling with a printed proof of vaccination status, it must date from 1 November to ensure that the certificate can be scanned successfully. Your NHS appointment card from vaccination centres is not designed to be used as proof of vaccination and should not be used to demonstrate your vaccine status.

If you are resident in Malta and have a Maltese-issued vaccination certificate, the validity of your certificate is as follows:

  • The certificate is valid for 3 months from the date of the second dose (or the first dose for Jannsen / Johnson and Johnson vaccine)
  • The certificate is valid for 9 months from the date of the third dose (booster vaccination)

For vaccination certificates issued outside of Malta, the validity of that certificate will apply.

Full information is available on the Maltese government coronavirus advice page

Health

If you have COVID-19 symptoms, even if mild, you should contact the public health helpline on 111 and follow their instructions. Please note that 111 only works from local numbers. Please use +356 21324086, if calling from a foreign number.

For contact details for English speaking doctors visit our list of healthcare providers.

Your emotional and mental wellbeing is important. Read guidance on how to look after your mental wellbeing and mental health

View Health for further details on healthcare in Malta.

COVID-19 vaccines if you live in Malta

Wherever possible British nationals should aim to be vaccinated in the country where they live. We will update this page when the Government of Malta announces new information on the national vaccination programme. You can sign up to get email notifications when this page is updated.

The Maltese national vaccination programme started in March 2021 and is using the Janssen (Johnson and Johnson), Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines. British nationals resident in Malta are eligible for vaccination. Further details can be found on the Ministry of Health website. Details on how to get vaccinated is available by dialling 145 or by checking the Ministry of Health website. The number 145 can only be accessed from local numbers. From foreign numbers, please call +356 21324086.

British Nationals resident in Malta may apply for their vaccination through https://vaccin.gov.mt/. You will need to enter your residence card number, and a text message with the appointment date and location will be sent to you.

Find out more, including about vaccines that are authorised in the UK or approved by the World Health Organisation, on the COVID-19 vaccines if you live abroad webpage.

If you’re a British national living in Malta, you should seek medical advice from your local healthcare provider. Information about COVID-19 vaccines used in the national programme where you live, including regulatory status, should be available from local authorities.

Finance

For information on financial support you can access whilst abroad, visit our financial assistance guidance.

Further information

The Maltese Government has a coronavirus advice page and information is available from Visit Malta. A helpline is also available on 111.

If you need urgent consular assistance, contact your nearest British embassy, high commission or consulate. All telephone numbers are available 24/7.

Crime

Crime against tourists is rare although robberies, handbag snatching, pick-pocketing and theft from parked cars can occur. Safeguard passports, money and other valuables. Be vigilant when exchanging money and using ATMs, and avoid carrying large amounts of cash. Use the hotel’s own safe if possible.

There have been instances of pick-pocketing on bus routes between Valletta and St Julian’s. Thieves are targeting crowded buses during the summer season. Be vigilant and keep sight of valuables at all times. Local police are aware of the problem and conducting investigations.

Personal attacks, including rape and sexual assault do occur. Avoid splitting up from your friends and don’t go off with people you don’t know. If you drink, take sensible precautions including buying your own drinks and keeping sight of them at all times.

Scams

British and Maltese nationals are increasingly being targeted by scam artists operating globally. The scams come in many forms (romance and friendship, business ventures, work and employment opportunities) and can pose great financial risk to victims. Be very cautious about any requests for funds, a job offer, a business venture or a face to face meeting from someone you have been in correspondence with over the internet.

Hunting season

Bird hunting is practised during the spring and autumn. Dates are movable and determined by the government in the lead up to the season. Local print and online news media normally carry the start and end dates, and times of when hunting is allowed.

Hunting with firearms is common and is normally allowed from 2 hours before sunrise until 2 hours after sunset. Hunting areas are rarely marked and can overlap with camping areas, country walkways and other public areas. Although not common, incidents involving members of the public have occurred previously. Be aware of your surroundings when visiting rural areas and nature spots during the hunting seasons.

Road travel

Take care while driving as some roads are in poor condition. Keep to the speed limit. Local standards of driving are poor.

If you are planning to drive in Malta, see information on Driving Abroad.

Licences and documents

You can drive in Malta using your UK driving licence.

If you’re living in Malta, check the Living in Guide for information on requirements for residents.

Driving a British car abroad

You may need a UK sticker to drive your car outside the UK. From 28 September 2021 UK stickers have replaced GB stickers. Check the GOV.UK Displaying number plates website for more information on what to do if you are driving outside the UK.

Driving regulations

See the European Commission, AA and RAC guides to driving in Malta.

Swimming

During the summer, many beaches are patrolled by lifeguards and operate flag safety systems. You should make sure you understand the system and follow any warnings; red flags indicate dangerous or hazardous conditions. You should swim within designated swimming zones and take extra care if there are no life-guards, flags or signs. Follow local advice if jellyfish are present.

You can find more information and a general code of conduct for beaches in Malta on the Malta Tourism Authority website.

Although there’s no recent history of terrorism in Malta, attacks can’t be ruled out. You should be aware of the global risk of indiscriminate terrorist attacks, which could be in public places, including those visited by foreigners.

UK Counter Terrorism Policing has information and advice on staying safe abroad and what to do in the event of a terrorist attack. Find out more about the global threat from terrorism.

There’s a heightened threat of terrorist attack globally against UK interests and British nationals from groups or individuals motivated by the conflict in Iraq and Syria. You should be vigilant at this time.

Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs are strict. Convicted offenders can expect jail sentences and heavy fines. 

Contact the European Consumer Centre Malta for advice about disputes with traders.

This page has information on travelling to Malta. Check what you must do to return to the UK.

This page reflects the UK government’s understanding of current rules for people travelling on a full ‘British Citizen’ passport from the UK, for the most common types of travel.

The authorities in Malta set and enforce entry rules.

All travellers

Travellers are not required to complete a Passenger Locator Form for entry to Malta.

All passengers are required to present on arrival in Malta either a valid vaccination certificate, a negative PCR test taken within the last 72 hours, or a negative rapid antigen test taken within the last 24 hours.

You should not use the NHS testing service to get a test in order to facilitate your travel to another country. You should arrange to take a private test.

For further information about entry requirements visit the Maltese Government website.

Scheduled flights may be subject to short notice cancellation. Check the Malta Airport website or contact your airline to check the status of flights.

If you’re fully vaccinated

All passengers will be permitted to enter Malta with either a vaccination certificate or a negative PCR taken no longer than 72 hours before arrival, or a rapid antigen test taken no longer than 24 hours before arrival.

If you have received a booster, you are considered fully vaccinated for entry into Malta. There is currently no expiry date for booster jabs. If you have not received a booster, but have received two doses of a vaccine approved for use by Malta, then at least 14 and no more than 270 days must have passed since your second dose, to qualify as fully vaccinated.

For further information about entry requirements visit the Maltese Government website.

If you live in England, Scotland, Northern Ireland or Wales, Malta will accept the UK’s COVID vaccine certification (both the digital and letter versions) as proof of your vaccination status. Digital certificates must include a verifiable 2D barcode (QR code). Your NHS appointment card from vaccination centres is not designed to be used as proof of vaccination and should not be used to demonstrate your vaccine status.

If you received your vaccinations in the EU, then as of 1 July 2021 the EU digital COVID Certificates will be accepted.

If you received your vaccinations in a country that administers only one dose after recovery from COVID-19, and the vaccination certificate is accepted by the Maltese authorities, you may enter Malta if your certificate shows recovery from COVID at least six months before you arrive and one dose of an EMA-approved vaccine.

Find out if you qualify as fully vaccinated in Malta by checking the guidance issued by the Maltese authorities.

Proof of vaccination status

You can use the UK COVID Pass to demonstrate your vaccination record when entering Malta.

If you’re not fully vaccinated

You may enter Malta without being fully vaccinated. Travellers will need to provide a negative PCR taken no longer than 72 hours before arrival or a rapid antigen test taken no longer than 24 hours before arrival.

If you’ve had COVID-19 in the past year

If you’re travelling to Malta, you cannot use the UK proof of COVID-19 recovery record certifying that you have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months.

Children and young people

There are no requirements for children under the age of 12 to present a vaccination certificate or a PCR or Rapid Antigen test to enter Malta.
Children aged 12 to 18 will be permitted to enter Malta if they have either a valid vaccination certificate, a negative PCR test taken within the last 72 hours or a negative rapid antigen test taken within the last 24 hours.

For children under the age of 18, vaccination certificates with a full primary schedule have no expiry date.

For further information about entry requirements for children, visit the Maltese Government website.

If you’re transiting through Malta

There are no specific requirements for transiting through Malta.

Entry requirements if you have not been in the UK for the previous 14 days

There are no specific requirements for entering Malta if you have not been in the UK for the previous 14 days.

Exemptions

Compassionate reasons

Exemptions to the rules may apply under certain very limited circumstances, as dictated by the Maltese Health authorities.

Check your passport and travel documents before you travel

Passport validity

If you are planning to travel to an EU country (except Ireland), or Switzerland, Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Andorra, Monaco, San Marino or Vatican City, you must follow the Schengen area passport requirements.

Your passport must be:

  • Issued less than 10 years before the date you enter the country (check the ‘date of issue’)
  • valid for at least 3 months after the day you plan to leave (check the ‘expiry date’)

You must check your passport meets these requirements before you travel. If your passport was issued before 1 October 2018, extra months may have been added to its expiry date.

Contact the embassy of the country you are visiting if you think that your passport does not meet both these requirements. Renew your passport if you need to.

Visas

You can travel to countries in the Schengen area for up to 90 days in any 180-day period without a visa. This applies if you travel as a tourist, to visit family or friends, to attend business meetings, cultural or sports events, or for short-term studies or training.

If you are travelling to Malta and other Schengen countries without a visa, make sure your whole visit is within the 90-day limit. Visits to Schengen countries within the previous 180 days before you travel count towards your 90 days.

To stay longer, to work or study, for business travel or for other reasons, you will need to meet the Maltese government’s entry requirements. Check with the Maltese High Commission what type of visa and/or work permit you may need.

If you are travelling to Malta for work, read the guidance on visas and permits.

If you stay in Malta with a residence permit or long-stay visa, this does not count towards your 90-day visa-free limit.

Passport stamping

Check your passport is stamped if you enter or exit the Schengen area through Malta as a visitor. Border guards will use passport stamps to check you’re complying with the 90-day visa-free limit for short stays in the Schengen area. If relevant entry or exit stamps are not in your passport, border guards will presume that you have overstayed your visa-free limit.

You can show evidence of when and where you entered or exited the Schengen area, and ask the border guards to add this date and location in your passport. Examples of acceptable evidence include boarding passes and tickets.

You may also need to:

  • show a return or onward ticket
  • show you have enough money for your stay

If you are resident in Malta, read our Living in Malta guide for passport stamping information.

Yellow fever certificate requirements

Check whether you need a yellow fever certificate by visiting the National Travel Health Network and Centre’s TravelHealthPro website.

UK Emergency Travel Documents

UK Emergency Travel Documents are accepted for entry, airside transit and exit from Malta.

Returning to the UK

Check what you must do to return to the UK.

Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Check the latest information on risk from COVID-19 for Malta on the TravelHealthPro website.

See the healthcare information in the Coronavirus section for information on what to do if you think you have coronavirus while in Malta.

At least 8 weeks before your trip, check the latest country-specific health advice from the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC) on the TravelHealthPro website. Each country-specific page has information on vaccine recommendations, any current health risks or outbreaks, and factsheets with information on staying healthy abroad. Guidance is also available from NHS (Scotland) on the FitForTravel website.

General information on travel vaccinations and a travel health checklist is available on the NHS website. You may then wish to contact your health adviser or pharmacy for advice on other preventive measures and managing any pre-existing medical conditions while you’re abroad.

The legal status and regulation of some medicines prescribed or purchased in the UK can be different in other countries. If you’re travelling with prescription or over-the-counter medicine, read this guidance from NaTHNaC on best practice when travelling with medicines. For further information on the legal status of a specific medicine, you’ll need to contact the embassy, high commission or consulate of the country or territory you’re travelling to.

While travel can be enjoyable, it can sometimes be challenging. There are clear links between mental and physical health, so looking after yourself during travel and when abroad is important. Information on travelling with mental health conditions is available in our guidance page. Further information is also available from the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC).

Healthcare

You should get a free UK Global Health Insurance Card (GHIC) or European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) before leaving the UK. If you already have an EHIC it will still be valid as long as it remains in date.

The GHIC or EHIC entitles you to state provided medical treatment that may become necessary during your trip. Any treatment provided is on the same terms as Maltese nationals. If you don’t have your EHIC with you or you’ve lost it, you can call the NHS Overseas Healthcare Team on +44 191 218 1999 to get a Provisional Replacement Certificate.

It’s important to take out appropriate travel insurance for your needs. A GHIC or EHIC is not an alternative to travel insurance and you should have both before you travel. It does not cover all health-related costs, for example, medical repatriation, ongoing medical treatment and non-urgent treatment.
Read more about what your travel insurance should cover.

If you’re living in Malta, you can also find more information on healthcare for residents in our Living In Malta guide.

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, dial 112 and ask for an ambulance. If you are referred to a medical facility for treatment you should contact your insurance/medical assistance company immediately.

UK prescriptions are not recognised in Malta. If you need medication while travelling you should speak to a Maltese medical practitioner.

GPs may be found privately at most pharmacies, though their times of availability may vary.

Pharmacies are easily identified and usually bear a green cross outside the shop front.
Prescriptions issued from EU Member States may be fulfilled by a Maltese Pharmacist provided they can confirm that the issuer is a licensed medical practitioner, dentist or veterinary surgeon.

Available medication might not match the exact make and brand of those found in the UK or EU and you should confirm with the pharmacist or doctor that your prescription has a suitable local equivalent.

Where this is not possible you may need to be assessed by a Maltese medical practitioner and provided with a local prescription.

The currency of Malta is the Euro.

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission. If you need urgent help because something has happened to a friend or relative abroad, contact the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO) in London on 020 7008 5000 (24 hours).

Foreign travel checklist

Read our foreign travel checklist to help you plan for your trip abroad and stay safe while you’re there.

Travel safety

The FCDO travel advice helps you make your own decisions about foreign travel. Your safety is our main concern, but we can’t provide tailored advice for individual trips. If you’re concerned about whether or not it’s safe for you to travel, you should read the travel advice for the country or territory you’re travelling to, together with information from other sources you’ve identified, before making your own decision on whether to travel. Only you can decide whether it’s safe for you to travel.

When we judge the level of risk to British nationals in a particular place has become unacceptably high, we’ll state on the travel advice page for that country or territory that we advise against all or all but essential travel. Read more about how the FCDO assesses and categorises risk in foreign travel advice).

Our crisis overseas page suggests additional things you can do before and during foreign travel to help you stay safe.

Refunds and cancellations

If you wish to cancel or change a holiday that you’ve booked, you should contact your travel company. The question of refunds and cancellations is a matter for you and your travel company. Travel companies make their own decisions about whether or not to offer customers a refund. Many of them use our travel advice to help them reach these decisions, but we do not instruct travel companies on when they can or can’t offer a refund to their customers.

For more information about your rights if you wish to cancel a holiday, visit the Citizen’s Advice Bureau website. For help resolving problems with a flight booking, visit the website of the Civil Aviation Authority. For questions about travel insurance, contact your insurance provider and if you’re not happy with their response, you can complain to the Financial Ombudsman Service.

Registering your travel details with us

We’re no longer asking people to register with us before travel. Our foreign travel checklist and crisis overseas page suggest things you can do before and during foreign travel to plan your trip and stay safe.

Previous versions of FCDO travel advice

If you’re looking for a previous version of the FCDO travel advice, visit the National Archives website. Versions prior to 2 September 2020 will be archived as FCO travel advice. If you can’t find the page you’re looking for there, send the Travel Advice Team a request

Further help

If you’re a British national and you have a question about travelling abroad that isn’t covered in our foreign travel advice or elsewhere on GOV.UK, you can submit an enquiry. We’re not able to provide tailored advice for specific trips.

Visa and passport information is updated regularly and is correct at the time of publishing. You should verify critical travel information independently with the relevant embassy before you travel.